My portfolio is finally live. I’m no programmer, but I did my best to create a layout that displays reasonably well across different screen dimensions, as well as to introduce a degree of sophistication to how the text is laid out. This blog remains the place with the most current stuff I’m up to, but the portfolio gives a nice overview of my work.
American designer James Victore once spoke in an interview that doing a compilation of his work was like packing his old stuff into a box. It was the only way to move on. The interviewer teased him by saying that publishing a book was the exact opposite of hiding things in a box, to which he pretty much laughed and shrugged.
Joking aside, I think it says something about how one looks at his/her past. On one hand, I do kind of tire of certain old pieces of mine, sometimes not because of its quality, but simply because it’s “old news” (what that says about the timelessness of my designs I don’t know, heh). But for me, in a way, to get rid of something in my mind is to put my creations out there. So there is an interesting “keep it private/public”, love/hate relationship there.
It really is the only way to move on. And that I’ll do.
?

My portfolio is finally live. I’m no programmer, but I did my best to create a layout that displays reasonably well across different screen dimensions, as well as to introduce a degree of sophistication to how the text is laid out. This blog remains the place with the most current stuff I’m up to, but the portfolio gives a nice overview of my work.

American designer James Victore once spoke in an interview that doing a compilation of his work was like packing his old stuff into a box. It was the only way to move on. The interviewer teased him by saying that publishing a book was the exact opposite of hiding things in a box, to which he pretty much laughed and shrugged.

Joking aside, I think it says something about how one looks at his/her past. On one hand, I do kind of tire of certain old pieces of mine, sometimes not because of its quality, but simply because it’s “old news” (what that says about the timelessness of my designs I don’t know, heh). But for me, in a way, to get rid of something in my mind is to put my creations out there. So there is an interesting “keep it private/public”, love/hate relationship there.

It really is the only way to move on. And that I’ll do.

?



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At long last: some proper design work.

I’m going to shut up first, and let it speak for itself (for better or worse).

I was going to incorporate this video into my post on the Cannes Lions, because my experience of working on this animation was very much affected by other things out of my control. This is one of the last projects I did for my student exchange programme here in Germany, and I really wanted to get it right. I’ve only done one “proper” motion graphic piece before, and was looking forward to getting my hands dirty again.

It turned out to be a torturous process, because it’s unbelievably taxing on the brain when you have so many emails and other business to handle, yet all you want to do is to sit down and just… create. I need time and space for my brain to go blank (before it can be filled with ideas), and there wasn’t much of either of those things.

I’m proud of the result, not because it’s particularly groundbreaking or clever. I was able to pour my blood and sweat into something quite purely “artistic” (there’s no “message” involved), and escape the insanity for a minute. It was cathartic, and a proof to myself that I am still doing things for my own enjoyment amidst the frenzy. All this attention hasn’t completely corrupted me yet. I hope.

Thoughts?



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If you are in Shanghai, you may come across a poster I designed for Coca-Cola. The Chief Creative Officer of Ogilvy China got in touch with me, and offered me this amazing opportunity. I can’t thank them enough, and really hope we can keep doing work together in the future.

You can read an article about it on Ad Age. There’s also a set of pretty cool photos of passers-by posing with the ad on Ogilvy’s Flickr.

It has been half a year since my image went viral, and it never ceases to amaze me how much the incident has affected me.

When life gives you lemonade, pour some coke into it.

?



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On the Apple/Steve logo, and unexpected connections.
I was not planning to write at length about this subject anymore, but something made me want to share my thoughts one last time:
I received a comment yesterday from Albert, a Chinese gentleman in his late 50s, who saw a few photos I took that reminded him of his childhood. 
His story is very long, deeply personal, and a joy to read. I was not exactly sure how to respond in the comments, so I’m making this post. Because his message represents everything that’s been so wonderful about the experience.
I’ve been meaning to say this for a while: the best thing about my design going viral is not the publicity, or even the support I got from around the world (even though I greatly appreciate it). It’s the people I get to talk to, and the tales they share with me.
Whether it’s an email from Kevin Kern (the pianist — whose CD I later knew my father actually owns) sharing the role Apple products play in his life due to his visual impairment, or the story of a Chinese woman immigrating to the US, I love it all. I’ve met both “ordinary” people such as myself, and powerful individuals. Their stories and philosophies are equally fascinating.
Interestingly, the things people tell me are not always directly related to Apple, but I find that even more amazing in a way: the design has not only resonated with people concerning Steve’s passing, but has simply become a “window” for me to make all these connections. The comment I just received is not even about the design, but I assume that was how he found my blog.
It would be naive of me to think all these responses are a start to many friendships, but I treasure all these bits and pieces of life experiences people have shared. I’ll never forget the experience.
So, thank you, Albert, for your comment. It was a long and delightful read.
Maybe you’d like to share your thoughts? ;)

On the Apple/Steve logo, and unexpected connections.

I was not planning to write at length about this subject anymore, but something made me want to share my thoughts one last time:

I received a comment yesterday from Albert, a Chinese gentleman in his late 50s, who saw a few photos I took that reminded him of his childhood. 

His story is very long, deeply personal, and a joy to read. I was not exactly sure how to respond in the comments, so I’m making this post. Because his message represents everything that’s been so wonderful about the experience.

I’ve been meaning to say this for a while: the best thing about my design going viral is not the publicity, or even the support I got from around the world (even though I greatly appreciate it). It’s the people I get to talk to, and the tales they share with me.

Whether it’s an email from Kevin Kern (the pianist — whose CD I later knew my father actually owns) sharing the role Apple products play in his life due to his visual impairment, or the story of a Chinese woman immigrating to the US, I love it all. I’ve met both “ordinary” people such as myself, and powerful individuals. Their stories and philosophies are equally fascinating.

Interestingly, the things people tell me are not always directly related to Apple, but I find that even more amazing in a way: the design has not only resonated with people concerning Steve’s passing, but has simply become a “window” for me to make all these connections. The comment I just received is not even about the design, but I assume that was how he found my blog.

It would be naive of me to think all these responses are a start to many friendships, but I treasure all these bits and pieces of life experiences people have shared. I’ll never forget the experience.

So, thank you, Albert, for your comment. It was a long and delightful read.

Maybe you’d like to share your thoughts? ;)



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The emails, the interviews, the well wishes.
None of that compare to the fact that my design has reached 180000 people. I’m very glad that it has struck a chord in so many people’s hearts, and it’s a true testament to Steve’s influence and accomplishments.
I am so overwhelmed with work right now that I don’t even have the time to type out a proper post.
So thank you.
?
P.S. I’ll do a follow-up post shortly dealing with questions about the usage of my design.

The emails, the interviews, the well wishes.

None of that compare to the fact that my design has reached 180000 people. I’m very glad that it has struck a chord in so many people’s hearts, and it’s a true testament to Steve’s influence and accomplishments.

I am so overwhelmed with work right now that I don’t even have the time to type out a proper post.

So thank you.

?

P.S. I’ll do a follow-up post shortly dealing with questions about the usage of my design.



Comments (View)
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