My portfolio is finally live. I’m no programmer, but I did my best to create a layout that displays reasonably well across different screen dimensions, as well as to introduce a degree of sophistication to how the text is laid out. This blog remains the place with the most current stuff I’m up to, but the portfolio gives a nice overview of my work.
American designer James Victore once spoke in an interview that doing a compilation of his work was like packing his old stuff into a box. It was the only way to move on. The interviewer teased him by saying that publishing a book was the exact opposite of hiding things in a box, to which he pretty much laughed and shrugged.
Joking aside, I think it says something about how one looks at his/her past. On one hand, I do kind of tire of certain old pieces of mine, sometimes not because of its quality, but simply because it’s “old news” (what that says about the timelessness of my designs I don’t know, heh). But for me, in a way, to get rid of something in my mind is to put my creations out there. So there is an interesting “keep it private/public”, love/hate relationship there.
It really is the only way to move on. And that I’ll do.
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My portfolio is finally live. I’m no programmer, but I did my best to create a layout that displays reasonably well across different screen dimensions, as well as to introduce a degree of sophistication to how the text is laid out. This blog remains the place with the most current stuff I’m up to, but the portfolio gives a nice overview of my work.

American designer James Victore once spoke in an interview that doing a compilation of his work was like packing his old stuff into a box. It was the only way to move on. The interviewer teased him by saying that publishing a book was the exact opposite of hiding things in a box, to which he pretty much laughed and shrugged.

Joking aside, I think it says something about how one looks at his/her past. On one hand, I do kind of tire of certain old pieces of mine, sometimes not because of its quality, but simply because it’s “old news” (what that says about the timelessness of my designs I don’t know, heh). But for me, in a way, to get rid of something in my mind is to put my creations out there. So there is an interesting “keep it private/public”, love/hate relationship there.

It really is the only way to move on. And that I’ll do.

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If you are in Shanghai, you may come across a poster I designed for Coca-Cola. The Chief Creative Officer of Ogilvy China got in touch with me, and offered me this amazing opportunity. I can’t thank them enough, and really hope we can keep doing work together in the future.

You can read an article about it on Ad Age. There’s also a set of pretty cool photos of passers-by posing with the ad on Ogilvy’s Flickr.

It has been half a year since my image went viral, and it never ceases to amaze me how much the incident has affected me.

When life gives you lemonade, pour some coke into it.

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I see a poster for a ballet/opera.



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Who knew an old sketch I did could lead to hours of fun?

Continuing to try out looser, rougher shapes.

Feel free to tell me the one(s) you prefer. These are just four (see the other post) of the many, many versions I did.



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Experimenting
(click to enlarge)
Past “styles”: here, here, here, here, here, here, and many more… that’s what I get for not tagging my posts properly.

Experimenting

(click to enlarge)

Past “styles”: here, here, here, here, here, here, and many more… that’s what I get for not tagging my posts properly.



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Ought to be shot

Many people were protesting outside the Dolce & Gabbana flagship store here in Hong Kong yesterday. They were upset about the fact that a security guard of the store tried to stop people standing in a public space from taking photos. But few of the online overseas news report I read got the point of the protest. The guard said tourists from Mainland China are allowed to shoot photos, presumably because they are typically far bigger spenders than the locals. Whether it’s outright hostility or passive-aggressive behavior, we’ve long been treated differently, and there’ve been other factors stirring up tension between the Hong Kongers and those from the Mainland.

The issue is obviously not just about D&G. The event just sparked off some longstanding grievances. It’s about inequality, the right over public space, cultural identities, and above all, our dissatisfaction with a government/society obsessed with money.

Thoughts?



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